WRECKWATCH TV has launched… Co-founded and hosted by Sean Kingsley and Chris Atkins.

 

CLICK HERE to dive in. SIGN UP on Wreckwatch mag's Home page to keep informed & for updates.

Planet Earth is 71% water. We’ve been trying to tame the waves for millennia. They say there are three million wrecks out there, but less than 0.5% of them have been found… so far.

 

Join Wreckwatch TV (WWTV) as we explore the world’s oceans for sunken history, treasure and the special people who search for it. 

 

WWTV hosts regular programmes:

  • We share the latest finds in Seven Seas News.

  • Meet intrepid explorers in our Sunken Lives series.

  • From On The Beach, we visit the latest exhibitions and everything with a watery vibe.

  • We investigate whether Treasure Is Trouble.

  • Wreckwatch TV will bring you the latest must-read books and don’t-miss films.

  • We test the best new tech from dive gear to submersibles.

 

The truth is out there. Deep down we care. 

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Dr. Sean Kingsley – dubbed the David Attenborough of shipwrecks by Riviera Buzz – has explored 350 wrecks, from Phoenician and Byzantine ships in 2 metres off Israel to the world’s deepest wrecks found using robots in 4,700 metres off Ireland. He has a doctorate from Oxford University and has been the lead archaeologist on the first-rate warship the Victory (1744) off England, the greatest warship of the early Georgian age of sail, sunk in the English Channel in 1744. As Guest Curator for Voices from the Deep at London’s Postal Museum, he showcased 700 letters recovered from the British India steamship the Gairsoppa (1941). 

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Sean’s published 14 books. He’s the founder and Editor-in-Chief of Wreckwatch magazine and writes for National Geographic and Smithsonian Magazine. Enslaved, The Sunken History of the Transatlantic Slave Trade was published in 2022 with co-author Simcha Jacobovici (Pegasus Books). Sean’s currently writing a book about the golden age of piracy.

 

Sean has developed and appeared in documentaries for all the major networks from History and the Discovery channels to the BBC. In 2020 he appeared in Samuel L. Jackson’s Enslaved (Epix/BBC2) and Drain the Oceans for National Geographic.

 

Sean lives on the edge of Windsor Great Park in the UK with his wife Lexi and son, Felix.   

Canadian filmmaker Chris Atkins has travelled the world, often to places where most people would not want to go. From filming underwater beneath 14 inches of ice to following a herd of reindeer across the frozen tundra of Siberia, to Afghanistan following Canadian troops, archaeological digs in Israel and to the front lines of ISIS in Iraq, Chris has experienced things few others ever will.

 

Recently Chris has made a return to his first love of exploring the underwater world, as the on-camera diver and underwater photographer for the team searching for a lost Nazi U-boat in Laurence Fishburne’s History’s Greatest Mysteries on the History Channel, and as the ROV pilot and

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dive partner of Mike Fletcher from the Sea Hunters and Dive Detectives’ series, searching for a shipwreck off the east coast of Canada. 

 

Chris's passion for exploration and conservation of the Great Lakes and oceans has made him more aware than ever of the devastation of our most precious resource. He is determined to do what he can to clean up our waters and use his camera and voice to share these stories that often remain just out of sight, beneath the surface.

 

Chris directed, co-wrote and shot the archaeology series Unearthed for Vision TV, as well as shooting, writing and directing the documentaries Hijacking The Holy Land, Freedom Fighter, and the six-part documentary series Israel: A Journey Through Time, among many other videos and television programmes. Chris and his work have appeared on History, National Geographic Channel, CNN, Fox News, Smithsonian Channel, Zoomer, Vision TV, TSN, CTS, Yes TV, PBS, Netflix and many others over the years.

 

www.chrisatkins.ca

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